Aug 192015
 
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Welcome to this new Ghost of a Tale development update!

Since the inventory is now functional I recently I did a final pass on the dynamic props system. And I’m quite happy with its versatility. Basically Tilo can find a lot of wearable items that give him various resistances and boosts. Those items can be equipped on his ears, head, face, chest, waist, etc…

For example here you can see him dressed as a famous pirate (I won’t spoil it too much since it’s related to a specific quest).

 

And when wearing a complete costume set Tilo receives a further skill bonus. These costume items can be found all over the place (well actually some of them are quite hard to get) and are often related to the game’s folklore figures or even past Dwindling Heights prisoners.

The interesting thing is the NPCs will react differently depending on how Tilo is dressed (reflected in the dialogs). The possibilities of mix-and-match are also super nice; you can really create different (and rather unique) looks for Tilo.

Here he’s wearing Tulong’s costume; Tulong was an infamous highwaymouse and donning his outfit does come with some nice perks… :)

 

Now to the game’s development in general: I know some of you are extremely eager to start playing but quite a few things remain to be done before we can consider going into the pre-release (aka “Early Access”) stage.

As far as the Xbox One is concerned Microsoft tentatively mentioned maybe using the new Xbox One early access program but nothing concrete was decided yet. If, for whatever reason, it is not possible to go down that route then it means Xbox One users will most likely have to wait for 2016 before they can try the game.

On the PC (Windows) front it is my wish to reach early access stage before the end of November (2015). In that regard the next two months are going to be crucial in terms of development. We have made contact with Steam and things seem to be on the right track. Of course I will keep you guys updated with any progress being made.

All this being said, it is downright freaking exciting to see pieces coming together as game systems start to respond and influence each-other. Recently I was revisiting the old jail (the starting area) and it was soooo nice to feel like you’re immersed in this world right from the start…

ScreenShot 2015_08_11 09;38;34001

(Right-click on the picture and choose “View Image” to see the high-resolution)

I really hope you guys like it when you get a chance to take a stroll down those dank corridors!

Anyway, as usual please leave your comments and questions below and I’ll do my best to answer them. See you in the next update! :)

Apr 142014
 
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Welcome everyone! As promised this update is going to focus on the game’s lore, an aspect which has mostly been kept under wraps until now. As you all know Ghost of a Tale takes place in a medieval world inhabited by animals, each species ruling over its own kingdom. And among those kingdoms the Rats are considered one of the most powerful species. Although creatures far more fearsome exist, it is a well-known fact that, through sheer force of numbers, the Rat Army is capable of defeating almost any foe.

Today some say the Rats’ influence is so wide and far-reaching that it is more empire than kingdom. The origin of the Rat’s powerful influence can be traced all the way back to the War of the Green Flame, many centuries ago, when the world was teetering on the edge of the Bright Abyss.

Fresco

No one remembers where the Green Flame appeared first. A force without conscience or thought, it killed and consumed all those standing in its path. The fallen would then grow the ranks of its army, becoming soulless puppets of the necromantic power. The great battle has passed into myth and legend now – but some facts are indisputable: the mighty Badgers of Baladhon fought and lost and even the Hawks of Halenvir fell from the sky. None of them could turn back the foul invasion.

When the news of the advancing army of the Green Flame reached the capital of each kingdom there was much debate. Some believed the Green Flame could be subjugated, used as a source of power. For others it was capable of nothing but death and decay. These quarrels took far too much time to resolve and when the Council of Asper finally stood together at last to face the Green Flame it was all but too late.

The Mice, fearing the end of their kind, attempted to send an emissary to negotiate surrender in exchange for revealing weaknesses in fortresses they had helped to design. Their actions were rightly perceived as a betrayal by the other creatures and the Green Flame laid waste to the mouse kingdom all the same.

It was then that the Rats took matters into their own hands. King Rodgar-the-First, seconded by his general Jahrlan (whom some say was the war’s true hero), led his soldiers into battle against the Green Flame’s army. There the Rats made their stand, single-handedly defeating the greatest threat the world had ever faced. Jahrlan did not survive the battle, but had he done so he would have had a chance of becoming king himself.

After the war most of the mouse lands were annexed, and Mice were never again allowed to bear arms. Nor did they ever formally regain the right to sit on the Council of Asper. There are some who say enough time has passed and that Mice should not today have to bear responsibility for their ancestor’s actions. But Rats are not known for their forgiveness.

It is interesting to note that the only trace of what might truly have happened in those long-forgotten days can be found in the oral tradition of the Myghlar Magpies, the Truth Sayers, who now inhabit the ancient tower of Periclave. To this day they scour the kingdoms, bartering in the only currency they respect: stories – facts, mostly, but also legends and songs. Yet even in their account of the War of the Green Flame one can find only glimmers of truth – the mere ghost of a tale.

One could also wonder where Tilo, the humble minstrel mouse, fits in History’s grand tapestry. After all he is merely a tiny stitch made with a single thread. But it only takes a snag in a single thread for the whole tapestry to unravel. And Tilo’s own story will be the subject of an upcoming update… :)